jump to navigation

Shout out for Cancer Research, and an awesome name- Dr. Suetonia Palmer August 24, 2012

Posted by The Raise Project in Award Winners, Featured Prize, Women in Science.
Tags: , , , , , , ,
add a comment

Shout out for cancer research. How do platelets help or hinder the process of treatment?

Read the Original Here.

University of Otago researcher Dr Suetonia Palmer is one of three recipients of a $25,000 L’Oreal For Women in Science Fellowship, awarded in Melbourne on Tuesday.

The other two are a Melbourne researcher who battled leukemia as a teenager and a scientist recognized for her work in nanotechnology.

Dr Palmer received the award for her work in chronic kidney disease.

Working from temporary facilities as Christchurch rebuilds, she is guiding doctors and policy makers across the world as they attempt to make the best decisions for their patients.

The fellowship will take her work further and help her study what information people receive when their kidney disease worsens and they have to go on dialysis.

That usually requires four hours a day, four days a week in hospital. However, in Christchurch most people have dialysis machines at home.

Dr Palmer will determine what is best practice.

She is also a senior lecturer in the Department of Medicine.

Dr Kylie Mason from Melbourne’s Walter and Eliza Hall Institute will investigate ways to reduce the side-effects of new cancer drugs and explore the role of platelets.

She has previously researched ways to extend the life of platelets, the cell fragments that manage blood clotting.

Cancer patients often need platelet transfusions but supply can be a challenge for blood banks because the cells only last five days.

Her work could pave the way to increase the blood bank life of platelets as well as helping cancer patients.

Her battle with leukemia sparked a lifelong interest and career in medicine and research.

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute director Dr Doug Hilton said Dr Mason’s personal battle with cancer had not only fueled her passion for medicine and research, but given her a unique perspective as a cancer patient, haematologist, scientist, and mother.

Melbourne scientist Dr Jia Baohua from Swinburne University of Technology was recognized for her role in developing low cost solar energy using nanotechnology to create thin-film solar cells.

What Calypso Rose can tell us about STEM August 7, 2012

Posted by The Raise Project in Career, Women in Science.
Tags: , ,
add a comment

Palms swaying, steel drums and broad smiles. Calypso singing used to be a man’s field. Hear this now-72-year-old gal’s view on breaking that glass conch shell.

Read the Original here.

Calypso Rose: What the “Lioness of the Jungle” can tell us about STEM

A few weeks back I saw the documentary, “Calypso Rose: Lioness of the Jungle,” about the first professional woman Calypso singer from Trinidad. Calypso Rose was the first woman to win the Calypso King contest and the Trinidad Road March competition in the 1970s. Still performing at 72 years old, she’s now written more than 800 songs. Some of her calypsos are about women’s issues such as domestic violence, and she’s used her platform of music to bring awareness around the world.

In her documentary, she talks about how much resistance she faced as the first woman calypso singer and many of the stories she told sounded so familiar – they are the stories of all women breaking into a man’s world. First, how fellow musicians tried to ban her from competing in the formerly all-male Calypso King contest, but she persisted and eventually even won the competition. Later she talked about how she was so careful not to have relations with any of the other musicians she was working with, and living with, in the Calypso tents, yet there were still rumors that she was sleeping with all the male musicians and then other rumors that she was sleeping with the female musicians. Through it all, she kept her head high, and focused on her music.

During the film, a professional female calypso singer from St. Lucia meets Calypso Rose for the first time and is overcome with emotion. She tells Calypso Rose that she has been her role model all of her life and that she helped her to see it was possible for her to pursue her own career in this male-dominated genre of music. While today, we don’t have that many more women firsts remaining in the US, the dynamic is still the same for women and girls who might be the firsts in their families, their communities, their schools, and among their friends. They still need the hope and inspiration of the female role models who have gone before them so that they know they too can do it. Not everyone can be a pioneer like Calypso Rose, pioneers by their nature are few in numbers, but all girls can feel it’s possible to be a Calypso singer, a drummer like Sheila E, an astronaut like Sally Ride, or a surgeon general like Dr. Joycelyn Elders. Or equally important, a computer network technician perhaps like her Aunt, a geographic information systems analyst like her sister, or an auto technician like her neighbor Sue. Female role models help women and girls see their own unlimited potential.

Is there a female role model who inspired you? Please share in the comments the person in your life who helped you see your own potential.

Warmly,

Donna

PS I love Calypso Rose’s music, and following the documentary I went home and downloaded her Best of Calypso Rose album and it’s my new work out music playlist! You can’t but help move when you are listening to it. Go to her website to hear her music and see clips from her documentary. I’d love to share the joy of Calypso Rose’s music with all of you!

Go Pam Maynard! July 9, 2012

Posted by The Raise Project in Award Winners, Featured Prize, Women in Science.
Tags: , , , , ,
2 comments

If blueprints aren’t your thing, it doesn’t mean you should rule out a career in Tech. There are such a wide variety of jobs in the field. Thanks for your insight, Ms. Maynard. And congrats on winning your First Women Award!

Read the Original Here. 

By Pam Maynard

At the very end of last month Real Business announced the winners of the 2012 First Women Awards. Designed to recognize pioneering women whose achievements open opportunities for others, the awards showcase the wealth of career opportunities available for women in the science and technology sectors, aiming to inspire more women into the profession by highlighting the success of leading women in the field.

This year I was one of the lucky ones to be honored with a win in the First Women of Science & Technology category.

I have been in the technology industry for over 15 years and can truly say that I enjoy my work and always look to push myself beyond the boundaries – both real and perceived – of being a female in the sector. The sad fact however is that despite ongoing efforts, technology remains a less-thought of career path for female graduates.

The key misconception out there is that women simply can’t have a successful career in technology. This is absolutely not true and is something that we should all be working to change. We need to get more women into technology at an early age but to do so we need to be able to highlight powerful examples of women who are excelling in their careers. If you look at organizations in the UK like Capgemini, Accenture and Microsoft, and other FTSE 100 companies you can find very successful females with technology-focused careers – the challenge now is to make sure we are raising their profiles as high as they can go.

Another misconception about technology as a career is that it is very narrow in scope. In fact, a career in technology is so much broader – it is not just about developing technology solutions and technology companies do not have to be full of technologists. There is a huge set of different roles that sit around the delivery of a technology solution and require different skillsets. Whether it is project management or business analysis, these types of roles often come with an increased requirement for collaboration – one of the softer skills found more in women than men. If companies want to start bringing in more female talent, they need to get better at recognizing and defining the skillset they require from employees and reflecting this back in their recruitment efforts.

If I were going to use my recent win as a platform to speak to girls considering a career in technology my first piece of advice above all else would be for them to have confidence in their value. Today’s young women need to have more self-belief and recognize the value in the unique skills and experience that they can bring to the sector. Males and females bring different skillsets to any work place and a balanced gender mix is optimal for the success of any business.

Among Doctors, Too, Women Are Paid Less July 3, 2012

Posted by The Raise Project in Career, Women in Science.
Tags: , , , , ,
2 comments

Chosen because of their similarity to one another in professional interests, aptitude and ambition, the doctors in the study each had received a highly prestigious research grant early in their careers and worked in academic medical centers.

The study controlled for specialty, publications, academic rank, hours worked and leadership positions…

Result: a man *still* made an average of $12,000 more annually than a woman.

Read the original here.

Dr. Pauline Chen

Brilliant and hard-working, my younger colleague had just returned from delivering one of the main talks at a national medical meeting. All of us viewed the invitation to speak as an acknowledgment of her great potential, so when I asked her about the conference, I expected her to bubble over about the accolades she’d heard and the plum job offers she’d received from competing medical centers.

But she hardly smiled as she recounted her experiences.

“During the question-and-answer session I kept falling back on phrases like ‘maybe,’ ‘perhaps’ and ‘I guess so,’ ” she said. Though she had the experience and data to rebut even the most aggressive or erroneous challenges from doctors in the audience, her tentative manner seemed to leave her vulnerable to doubts and even more questioning.

What’s more, she added, she had noticed that many of the other female speakers responded to their audiences as she had, with wavering and hesitant replies, while most of the men answered “with such confidence and bravado that we women looked pretty amateur in comparison.”

The experience had shaken my colleague’s quiet confidence. “I always thought the strength of my work was all that mattered in medicine,” she said. “Now I can’t help but wonder if other factors are involved.”

This was not the first time I had heard a colleague speculate on how her sex might affect the way others treated her professionally, but we all thought medicine was one of the few careers in which men and women working the same hours and producing comparable results in similar specialties would be paid and promoted equally. While some studies found income disparities between male and female doctors, researchers chalked up their findings to the fact that fewer women worked in higher-paying specialties and more men worked longer hours.

But a study published recently in The Journal of the American Medical Association reveals that medicine may not be so meritocratic after all.

Researchers analyzed the professional trajectories of almost 2,000 midcareer physician-researchers. Chosen because of their similarity to one another in professional interests, aptitude and ambition, the doctors in the study each had received a highly prestigious research grant early in their careers and worked not in private practice but in academic medical centers. The researchers examined a wide range of career factors, including the number of hours worked, professional achievements, leadership positions, marital status, parental status and salary.

As in some earlier studies, the researchers found a difference in income, with a male doctor’s annual salary averaging just over $200,000 and a female’s averaging about $168,000. And like previous researchers, they found that the female doctors tended to be in lower-paying specialties, have fewer publications, work fewer hours and hold fewer administrative leadership positions.

But when these researchers ran the numbers again, this time adjusting for differences in specialty, publications, academic rank, hours worked and leadership positions, they found that the expected average salary for women still fell behind that of their male colleagues. The male doctors made over $12,000 per year more than the women. Calculated over the course of a 30-year career, the income gap based on sex alone amounted to over $350,000.

“We really didn’t expect to find such a substantial unexplained difference,” said Dr. Reshma Jagsi, lead author and an associate professor of radiation oncology at the University of Michigan. “In Michigan, that amount buys you a house, your kids’ education or a nice nest egg for retirement.”

There may be several reasons for this income difference. A previous study by a group of psychologists, for example, showed that when presented with identical résumés, one from a man and one from a woman, employers of both sexes were more likely to hire the man. A similar unconscious bias is likely to exist among doctors, influencing how much female physicians are paid and promoted. “It’s not like the medical centers or the department heads are evil,” Dr. Jagsi said. “The problem is that sometimes in medicine we think we are immune to these pervasive biases.”

Male and female doctors may also interact differently with their superiors when talking about payment and promotions. Women in other fields have been shown to negotiate less aggressively than their male peers. In medicine, that would mean women are less inclined to ask for more money and less likely to leverage offers from competing institutions or practices.

While the current study looks at only one small and homogeneous subset of physicians, the findings are probably applicable to many more doctors. “The men and women we studied were the go-getters,” Dr. Jagsi said. “You have to worry that if you see such disparities among this group, you will see at least the same, if not more, differences among other groups of physicians.”

Dr. Jagsi believes that greater transparency would decrease, and even eliminate, the income differences. Currently, it is difficult for most doctors to know if they are being paid fairly “since most institutions don’t have clear policies on how to determine salaries,” she noted. But standardizing the process of compensation and career advancement would make everyone involved more accountable for such decisions and “allow men and women to be paid as much as the work they are doing is worth,” she said.

“Society makes a huge investment in every medical trainee,” Dr. Jagsi said. “If we make that kind of investment, we need to ensure that compensation and advancement are fair.”

She added, “It comes down to a matter of basic fairness.”

Women’s scientific achievements often overlooked and undervalued May 24, 2012

Posted by The Raise Project in Women in Science.
Tags: , , , , ,
add a comment

New study shows award committee chairs inclined to choose men as award recipients.

See original here.

Los Angeles, CA (May 8, 2012) A new study from Social Studies of Science (published by SAGE) reveals that when men chair committees that select scientific awards recipients, males win the awards more than 95% of the time. This new study also reports that while in the past two decades women have begun to win more awards for their scientific achievements, compared to men, they win more service and teaching awards and fewer prestigious scholarly awards than would be expected based on their representation in the nomination pool.
The authors wrote, “On the face of them, awards for women may not raise concerns … yet women-only awards can camouflage women’s underrepresentation by inflating the number of female award recipients, leading to the impression that no disparities exist.”
The researchers analyzed the composition of award committees in order to explain why there is such a large disparity between male and female scientific award recipients. They found that committees that were chaired by men awarded 95.1% of their prizes to men despite the fact that women made up 21% of the nomination pools. While having women on a committee did increase the chances that women were awarded prizes, women made up only 19.5% of the average award committee and male chairs trumped any effect of having women on the committee.
Researchers Anne E. Lincoln, Stephanie Pincus, Janet Bandows Koster, and Phoebe S. Leboy studied the dissemination of awards given by 13 societies from the disciplines of science, technology, engineering, and medicine (STEM) between 1991 and 2010. They found that while awards to women increased by 78.5 % during these two decades, between the years of 2000 and 2010, men were more than eight times more likely than women to win a scholarly award and almost three times more likely to win a young investigator award. Interestingly, this disparity grew instead of diminishing between the years of 2001 and 2010 – women won 10% of research-based awards while winning 32.2 % of service awards and 37.1 % of teaching awards.
The researchers suggested some possible solutions to this problem such as increasing the proportion of female nominees for all types of scientific prizes, ensuring that women are well represented on prize committees, constantly reviewing award criteria to check for implicit bias, and establishing an oversight committee to maintain standards of equality.
“The fact that women are honored twice as often for service as for scholarship may arise from … the tacit assumption that scientists and rigorous scholars are men, and that women are incongruent with the scientist role,” wrote the authors. “Professional societies must inform leadership and awards committees about such bias.”

Sky Blue, Water Wet, Achievements of Female Scientists Continually Ignored by Men May 14, 2012

Posted by The Raise Project in Women in Science.
Tags: , , , , , ,
add a comment

Over the last two decades, women have made inroads into the male-dominated fields of science, technology, engineering, and medicine. But you wouldn’t know it if you asked the men who tend to chair scientific awards committees, who award research-based science awards to men 95% of the time. If a glass ceiling breaks and no one is around to notice, is it really broken?

The depressing statistic is brought to you by a 20-year survey of awards given out by 13 different STEM societies. Researchers found that even though awards given to female scientists increased 78% between 1991 and 2010, most of those awards were given in the areas of teaching or service. The “hard science” awards were still given to men, and they were especially given to men if the chair of the awards committee was also a man.

It’s not that women weren’t being nominated for scientific awards, either; researchers concluded that the frequency with which they actually won wasn’t consistent with the frequency with which they were nominated for awards. So this isn’t a case of Ladies Be Hating The Science.

These and other findings regarding bias in the selection of scientific awards will be published in the journal Social Studies of Science (published by SAGE) this month.

Read it if you want to feel frustrated about something.

 

Original article found Here: http://jezebel.com/5908938/sky-blue-water-wet-achievements-of-female-scientists-continually-ignored-by-men

Bringing Women Into the Clean Energy Workforce May 7, 2012

Posted by The Raise Project in Career, Women in Science.
Tags: , , ,
add a comment

SustainableBusiness.com News

http://www.sustainablebusiness.com/index.cfm/go/news.display/id/23668

One of the new programs announced at the Clean Energy Ministerial conference aims to bring more women into the clean energy workforce and support their advancement into leadership positions.

There is a well-documented gender gap in the clean energy professions, as in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

Studies show that organizations’ outcomes qualitatively improve when the leadership is composed of at least 30% of each gender.

Australia, Denmark, Mexico, Norway, South Africa, Sweden, the United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, and United States each committed to undertake meaningful activities to advance women in clean energy. Each country is developing its own plan, tailored to its unique workforce and industry needs.

The US Department of Energy (DOE) announced a three-part plan in concert with MIT’s Energy Initiative to begin implementing the Clean Energy Education and Empowerment initiative (C3E) in the US.

The partners will hold a “Women in Clean Energy” Symposium and an awards program in September.

The U.S. C3E plan:

AMBASSADORS: distinguished senior professionals who share an interest in broadening the recruitment, retention and advancement of highly qualified women in clean energy will serve as champions and select the people who will receive awards.

Ambassadors include: Maxine Savitz, Vice President of the National Academy of Engineering and member of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology; Kim Saylors-Laster, Vice President for Energy, Walmart; Kateri Callahan, President of the Alliance to Save Energy; Dorothy Robyn, Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Installations & Environment; and Nancy Pfund, Founder and Managing Partner of DBL Investors.

AWARDS: The DOE C3E Awards program will recognize mid-career individuals who advance the leadership and accomplishments of women in clean energy.

Six awards will be given, including a cash prize of $10,000.

SYMPOSIUM: an invitation-only annual symposium on September 28 will bring together women and men, including the Ambassadors, awardees, academia, NGOs, industry, and representatives from other C3E partner governments to help build a strong national and international community of professionals who support women in clean energy.

At the Ministerial conference, Sweden’s Minister of Information Technology & Energy, Anna?Karin Hatt, and South Africa’s Director General of Energy, Nelisiwe Magubane, delivered keynote addresses at the C3E event, followed by a moderated panel discussion on the policies and programs that have been effective in increasing women’s participation in the clean energy workforce.

Website: www.cleanenergyministerial.org/our_work/women_in_clean_energy/index.html

MIT’s Amy Finkelstein Wins John Bates Clark Medal April 30, 2012

Posted by The Raise Project in Award Winners, Featured Prize.
Tags: , , , , ,
add a comment

By Neil Shah of the Wall Street Journal

Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Amy Finkelstein won the American Economic Association’s John Bates Clark medal.

The economics profession’s most prestigious award after the Nobel Prize, the Clark medal is given every year to the nation’s most promising economist under the age of 40. It’s a good predictor of future Nobel Prize winners: Of the 34 people who have won the award since 1947 — the Clark used to be given biennially — 12 went on to the win the Nobel Prize later, including Paul Samuelson and Milton Friedman. (One economist calls the Nobel Prize “the Clark with a 25-year lag.”)

The 38-year-old Finkelstein has focused on public finance, health economics and the insurance market.

In one experiment, she and other researchers tracked a group of low-income, uninsured adults in Oregon who were randomly picked to get — or not get — the chance to apply for public health insurance. Because it was a randomized controlled trial, the experiment sidestepped common pitfalls that researchers examining the effects of insurance face, including the tendency of sicker people — or unusually healthy people — to seek insurance.

The result: A year later, those selected by the lottery to be able to apply for Medicaid were more likely to have Medicaid, used more health care, had lower out-of-pocket medical expenditures and reported better physical and mental health.

Read original article here: http://blogs.wsj.com/economics/2012/04/27/mits-amy-finkelstein-wins-john-bates-clark-medal/

On Nobel Prizes, and why Girls Should eat Cake in History Lessons November 8, 2011

Posted by The Raise Project in Women in Science.
Tags: , , ,
2 comments

It was with fascination that I listened to Radio 4’s profile last week of Jocelyn Bell Burnell – the scientist whose claim to fame is being passed over for the Nobel Prize for physics, despite being the person who discovered pulsars. Rather, it was awarded to her male colleague instead.

She talked about how, when she was young, science just wasn’t something that was done by women.

“The problem actually started when I started secondary school,” she said in the interview. “[Girls] were sent to the domestic science room and the boys to the science lab.”

The problems continued at university where Bell Burnell was the only woman doing physics in her year: the male students would wolf whistle and stamp their feet as she walked into the lecture theatre.

I listened gobsmacked – and overcome with a profound sense of gratitude for my own education. Because where I was at school, being female wasn’t a cause for not being able to do something – it wasn’t even a cause for being particularly good at something: it just didn’t come into the equation at all.

I spent my formative years at one of the country’s pushier schools for girls, and whilst that wasn’t the school’s official name, it might as well have been. 25% of my year were accepted to Oxbridge; and one of the more memorable extra-curricular activities including a contemporary of mine putting on a production of the Bacchae – in the original Greek (she was one of the particularly brainy ones, admittedly).

But that doesn’t mean to say I had a terrible time – far from it. I absolutely loved the place – and not only for the fact that Dr Triffitt used to let us eat cake during triple History. Because the one characteristic school instilled in me (other than a lifelong terror of the conjugation of Latin verbs) is a sense of fearlessness about anything I turn my professional hand to, which is something for which I’ll be eternally grateful.

If a girl in my year had an aptitude for maths, then she studied maths, regardless of the fact that – as I’ve only come to realise since – it’s seen as a “boys’ subject”. It was the same across the curricular board: flair for science was met with as much encouragement in an A-level physics class as could possibly be mustered. Whether it was Design and Technology; or Electronics; or IT, it didn’t matter – we just went and did what we were good at. And those of us who were better with words, or languages, or music went our way too. Everything was based on aptitude and ability, rather than gender.

It’s only since I’ve left the confines of school that I’ve realised this isn’t how things work in the world at large – and, by God, it’s a poorer place for it. I find it baffling that still, now, some fifty years after Jocelyn had to put up with such disgraceful behaviour in order to pursue her career, that we’re still putting serious obstacles in the way of our clever girls by making them feel that, by simple fact of being female, they’re unable to pursue subjects they love. It’s no wonder women are woefully underrepresented in science and engineering if it’s insinuated from an early age that these aren’t fields for girls to play in.

The programmes available to attract women to careers in science are commendable, and have clearly got their work cut out. But that’s not how to solve the problem. Give girls the right attitude from the word go and there’d be no need to roll out special measures later down the line.

Who knows? A little more support in the classroom, and women like Bell Burnell might be more than one in a million.

Tech Jobs Up, Women Down April 28, 2011

Posted by The Raise Project in Career.
Tags: , , , ,
add a comment

Tech Jobs Up, Women Down 

Despite U.S. unemployment rates hovering around 9 percent, jobs in the technology sector are booming, according to a recent USA Today report. Additionally, 83 percent of startup companies in the technology sector plan to hire this year, up from 73 percent a year ago, according to a survey from Silicon Valley Bank.

The news is especially timely for soon-to-be college graduates, as now is the time of year when they hope to get their first real career job offers. Companies swoop in on these budding professionals, hoping to grab the brightest before the competition makes a better offer.

But there’s one catch: Women remain painfully underrepresented in technology-based jobs.