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Female Scientist Award May 20, 2013

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Carnegie Science Center established the Emerging Female Scientist Award to recognize the work of a female leader whose cutting-edge work inspires change in math, science, or technology. When asked about this award the institution indicated that female scientists are not self-nominating or being nominated for many of the other prestigious Carnegie science awards. Read about it here

Technology Can Help Us Live Longer January 31, 2013

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Health care and tech–a brilliant team. Once controlled by the healthcare industry, medical technology is moving into the hands of patients. Can we use the tech to make healthier choices, or do we rely on professionals to light a fire under us?

Florence Haseltine knows her stuff. Founding the Society for Women’s Health Research and co-directing the RAISE project, she’s been around the world in medicine and tech both–great article.

Read the original HuffPost article here. 

The world around us is changing minute by minute, and the way and how we communicate have markedly changed. Medicine is just part of the world that requires communication. Medicine is increasingly falling under the influence of new technologies to remind individuals when to take treatments, or when it’s time to monitor one’s vitals. The health care industry has become a technology-rich environment. The human-technology interface is rich for medical exploration, especially to combat some of the challenges that cause Americans — more than their peer nations — to have worse health, as highlighted by a number of recent news stories that discuss a report published by the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine. Technology supporting behavior change, resulting in healthier diets or in better management of chronic diseases, is just one area under trial and current exploration. The possibilities of what technology can do are endless.

Much is promised and much is justified on the basis it will improve our health and cost us less. For decades, the use of medical technology has been controlled by the medical profession, but with the expansion of personal mobile devices, it is moving into patients’ hands. In this shifting scenario, it has been said that medicine is now more influenced by smart enabled technologies than by pharmaceuticals. As evidence mounts that innovations such as smart devices can improve the health and care of an individual, more resources must be focused on their development and integration into the health care system.

The assumption is that technology will increasing integrate smart devices into the overall care of the patient. But as Alan Kay said in 1971, “The best way to predict the future is to invent it.” Verizon is determined to invent that future and help technology become more useable. To do so, the Verizon Foundation is reaching out to innovative healthcare providers and organizations to collaboratively build programs enabling them to integrate the use of technology to advance and improve health care. Recently, Verizon has been working with the Society for the Advancement of Women’s Health Research to bring health care to women in underserved areas. Since women frequently are the caregivers for their families while neglecting their own care, it seemed prudent to focus our joint effort on improving their care. If the women are comfortable using the smart devices, the families will follow. Every single person involved in this effort, and every health care provider who tries a new approach, is adding to the knowledge foundation we desperately need to incorporate the new mobile technologies into the medical world and help people manage their own health. The community expects mobile devices to improve health and we demand it.

For more by Florence P. Haseltine, Ph.D., M.D., click here.

For more health living health news, click here.

Wom-aceda-medic-eosis! Translation: Burnout. December 5, 2012

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First: Ohmigosh, wordpress is snowing! Squee!!

Second: On to real business. Do you, like our subject, get tired of being a woman in academic medicine? Longer hours for less recognition, a dismal rate of awards and prizes.. or is that just the nature of the field?

Read the original here. 

By Pauline Chen, M.D.

I recently learned that a doctor friend had seriously considered quitting her job at her medical school to go into private practice. As long as I have known her, she has talked about her love for teaching new doctors and conducting research while still caring for patients. Nonetheless, I wasn’t surprised to hear the reason she wanted to leave.

“I got tired of being a woman in academic medicine,” she said.

She recounted how, much more than her male colleagues, she would be assigned to work during major holidays, cover for others’ absences and sit on administrative committees that took time away from the research required to advance her career. When she spoke to her chairman about the discrepancies, he listened — but never responded to her repeated requests for a raise or more support.

What surprised me, however, was what finally persuaded her to stay. When she described her situation to some male colleagues, they listened attentively, then began relaying their frustrations with how little support they got from superiors.

“It’s hard being a woman here, but I concluded it’s not that great for anyone else either,” she said.

Sadly, her assessment seems to be correct, according to a recent study on the experiences of women and men working in medical schools.

Academic medical centers — institutions that have as their primary mission the training of new doctors, medical research and comprehensive clinical care – have long played a crucial role in how medicine is practiced in the United States. While historically most doctors were men, medical schools began broadening their admissions policies a little over a generation ago, so that women soon made up anywhere from a third to half of all students and trainees and an increasing percentage of the professors.

But in 2000, a landmark national survey of those working in these institutions revealed that gender bias was widespread. More than half of the women professors surveyed reported being discriminated against or sexually harassed, even as most of their male colleagues believed that such disparities in their institutions did not exist. Other studies found that women faculty members continued to make less money than their male peers, were promoted more slowly and even fared worse in academia’s most revered expression of meritocracy, the peer-review process.

Some researchers attributed the persistent issue to a “pipeline problem,” insufficient numbers of senior level women in medicine, particularly in certain specialties like surgery. Other experts postulated that women were more sensitive to unfair treatment because they tended to be more relationship-oriented than their male colleagues. Still others offered up what amounted to a tautological zinger: by choosing not to leave academic medicine, women simply had more opportunities to experience harassment.

The latest study, conducted as part of the National Initiative on Gender, Culture and Leadership in Medicine and published in The Journal of General Internal Medicine, offers another reason for women’s discontent in academic medical centers: the organizational culture, or the norms of behavior and implicit values of these institutions. And it’s not just women who are feeling demoralized.

The researchers administered a 20-minute questionnaire to over 2,000 faculty members at more than 25 academic medical centers and asked if their work energized them, if they felt ignored or invisible, if they felt pressure to be more aggressive or compromise their values and if their institution promoted altruistic and public service values.

As in earlier studies, more women than men felt marginalized and discriminated against, despite being as ambitious and engaged in work as their male colleagues. Many of the women also described a lack of trust in their institutions or little confidence that the discrimination they were experiencing would ever be addressed.

But both women and men expressed similarly negative feelings about a lack of support from their institutions for their work. And the men were just as likely as the women to feel what experts have termed “moral distress,” a sense of being trapped and forced to compromise on what one believes is right or just.

“We have this dehumanizing organizational culture in academic medicine that doesn’t allow people to realize their potential or be as vital and productive as they can be,” said the lead author, Dr. Linda H. Pololi, a senior scientist at Brandeis University who is also the director of the initiative. “It’s hard to ignore the far-reaching consequences of a work environment that has trouble modeling compassion and care.”

Based on this study and their earlier work, Dr. Pololi and her initiative collaborators have begun offering mentoring programs for faculty members, both female and male, at a handful of medical schools around the country. The program involves reading, writing and regular group exercises and discussions aimed at developing leadership skills and promoting a more open environment. In the Department of Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College, a preliminary survey has shown that the mentoring program, which has just begun its third year at the school, has already helped to increase the degree of trust among faculty members.

While it remains to be seen whether these changes will endure, it has become clearer that men, as well as women, stand to benefit from any improvement. “It is shocking that the situation for women in academic medicine hasn’t changed that much in the last 10 years,” Dr. Pololi said. “But it’s not always easy to notice the quality of an organization’s culture.”

She added: “That culture is like the air we breathe or the water that fish swim in. It has the potential, for better or worse, to affect everybody in the same way.”

Need a STEM mentor? Free! September 21, 2012

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Do you have highschool or college-age girls who need a mentor in STEM? Women In Technology Sharing Online (WitsOn) is creating an online community of learners and mentors through the networking platform Piazza. No grades! No pressure! Just a chance to learn or, if you’re a STEM professional, give back to the community a few hours per month (while lounging in your PJs, no less).

Check it out!

https://piazza.com/witson

Women in Technology Names Sensei Enterprises President Sharon D. Nelson, Esq. Winner of the 2012 Small Business Leadership Award May 23, 2012

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See original here:

May 23, 2012, 10:25 a.m. EDT

Women in Technology Names Sensei Enterprises President Sharon D. Nelson, Esq. Winner of the 2012 Small Business Leadership Award

FAIRFAX, Va., May 23, 2012 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ — Women in Technology, a Washington, D.C. area organization of professional women in the technology community, honored some of its own May 17 at the 13th Annual WIT Leadership Awards Banquet hosted by Maureen Bunyan, co-anchor for WJLA-TV ABC-TV News. The awards honor leading female professionals who have excelled as mentors and exemplified unique vision and talent in the technology industry during the previous year.

Ms. Nelson was asked to offer a favorite quote upon acceptance of her award. She quoted Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, who said “Well-behaved women rarely make history.” She therefore exhorted her fellow honorees “to resolve to go out and misbehave.” In a video filmed at the awards ceremony, Ms. Nelson challenged young girls to excel in mathematics and science, saying “Don’t let the boys have all the fun – you can do it – believe in yourselves!”

ABOUT SENSEI ENTERPRISES, INC.

Sensei Enterprises, Inc. is a nationally known digital forensics, information security and information technology company. Based in Fairfax, Virginia, Sensei combines legal expertise with high-level technical certifications to serve the technology needs of the legal and corporate communities. Sensei’s principals have written articles about legal technology for many publications, and co-authored The 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012 editions of the Solo and Small Firm Legal Technology Guide (ABA, 2008-2012),The Electronic Evidence Handbook: Forms, Guidelines and Checklists (ABA, 2006) and Locked Down: Information Security for Lawyers (ABA, 2012). To learn more, please visit http://www.senseient.com . They lecture about information security, information technology and digital forensics throughout the country.

For more information about this release, call Sharon D. Nelson, Esq. at 703-359-0700.

SOURCE Sensei Enterprises, Inc.

Sky Blue, Water Wet, Achievements of Female Scientists Continually Ignored by Men May 14, 2012

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Over the last two decades, women have made inroads into the male-dominated fields of science, technology, engineering, and medicine. But you wouldn’t know it if you asked the men who tend to chair scientific awards committees, who award research-based science awards to men 95% of the time. If a glass ceiling breaks and no one is around to notice, is it really broken?

The depressing statistic is brought to you by a 20-year survey of awards given out by 13 different STEM societies. Researchers found that even though awards given to female scientists increased 78% between 1991 and 2010, most of those awards were given in the areas of teaching or service. The “hard science” awards were still given to men, and they were especially given to men if the chair of the awards committee was also a man.

It’s not that women weren’t being nominated for scientific awards, either; researchers concluded that the frequency with which they actually won wasn’t consistent with the frequency with which they were nominated for awards. So this isn’t a case of Ladies Be Hating The Science.

These and other findings regarding bias in the selection of scientific awards will be published in the journal Social Studies of Science (published by SAGE) this month.

Read it if you want to feel frustrated about something.

 

Original article found Here: http://jezebel.com/5908938/sky-blue-water-wet-achievements-of-female-scientists-continually-ignored-by-men

Bringing Women Into the Clean Energy Workforce May 7, 2012

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SustainableBusiness.com News

http://www.sustainablebusiness.com/index.cfm/go/news.display/id/23668

One of the new programs announced at the Clean Energy Ministerial conference aims to bring more women into the clean energy workforce and support their advancement into leadership positions.

There is a well-documented gender gap in the clean energy professions, as in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

Studies show that organizations’ outcomes qualitatively improve when the leadership is composed of at least 30% of each gender.

Australia, Denmark, Mexico, Norway, South Africa, Sweden, the United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, and United States each committed to undertake meaningful activities to advance women in clean energy. Each country is developing its own plan, tailored to its unique workforce and industry needs.

The US Department of Energy (DOE) announced a three-part plan in concert with MIT’s Energy Initiative to begin implementing the Clean Energy Education and Empowerment initiative (C3E) in the US.

The partners will hold a “Women in Clean Energy” Symposium and an awards program in September.

The U.S. C3E plan:

AMBASSADORS: distinguished senior professionals who share an interest in broadening the recruitment, retention and advancement of highly qualified women in clean energy will serve as champions and select the people who will receive awards.

Ambassadors include: Maxine Savitz, Vice President of the National Academy of Engineering and member of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology; Kim Saylors-Laster, Vice President for Energy, Walmart; Kateri Callahan, President of the Alliance to Save Energy; Dorothy Robyn, Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Installations & Environment; and Nancy Pfund, Founder and Managing Partner of DBL Investors.

AWARDS: The DOE C3E Awards program will recognize mid-career individuals who advance the leadership and accomplishments of women in clean energy.

Six awards will be given, including a cash prize of $10,000.

SYMPOSIUM: an invitation-only annual symposium on September 28 will bring together women and men, including the Ambassadors, awardees, academia, NGOs, industry, and representatives from other C3E partner governments to help build a strong national and international community of professionals who support women in clean energy.

At the Ministerial conference, Sweden’s Minister of Information Technology & Energy, Anna?Karin Hatt, and South Africa’s Director General of Energy, Nelisiwe Magubane, delivered keynote addresses at the C3E event, followed by a moderated panel discussion on the policies and programs that have been effective in increasing women’s participation in the clean energy workforce.

Website: www.cleanenergyministerial.org/our_work/women_in_clean_energy/index.html

MIT’s Amy Finkelstein Wins John Bates Clark Medal April 30, 2012

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By Neil Shah of the Wall Street Journal

Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Amy Finkelstein won the American Economic Association’s John Bates Clark medal.

The economics profession’s most prestigious award after the Nobel Prize, the Clark medal is given every year to the nation’s most promising economist under the age of 40. It’s a good predictor of future Nobel Prize winners: Of the 34 people who have won the award since 1947 — the Clark used to be given biennially — 12 went on to the win the Nobel Prize later, including Paul Samuelson and Milton Friedman. (One economist calls the Nobel Prize “the Clark with a 25-year lag.”)

The 38-year-old Finkelstein has focused on public finance, health economics and the insurance market.

In one experiment, she and other researchers tracked a group of low-income, uninsured adults in Oregon who were randomly picked to get — or not get — the chance to apply for public health insurance. Because it was a randomized controlled trial, the experiment sidestepped common pitfalls that researchers examining the effects of insurance face, including the tendency of sicker people — or unusually healthy people — to seek insurance.

The result: A year later, those selected by the lottery to be able to apply for Medicaid were more likely to have Medicaid, used more health care, had lower out-of-pocket medical expenditures and reported better physical and mental health.

Read original article here: http://blogs.wsj.com/economics/2012/04/27/mits-amy-finkelstein-wins-john-bates-clark-medal/

The Girl in Computer Science: a Google Success Story April 2, 2012

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–Steve Rosenbaum The Huffington Post

There’s plenty of talk about the need to support women in tech, and in particular math and science education for girls as they move from middle school into junior high.

But for at least one high profile woman in technology — there’s a reasonable argument to be made that education should be ‘blind’ to gender.

To understand where this comes from, you have to hear her story.

Last week at the 92nd Street Y, Marissa Mayer kept a packed house glued to the story of how a young girl growing up in Wisconsin could be essentially a ‘geek’ while at the same time being on the dance squad.

Mayer grew up in Wausau Wisconsin, a city of 40,000 about 3 1/2 hours northwest of Milwaukee. She was one of the top debaters at Wausau West High School. But she joined the dance squad as well — a geeky teenager who wanted to show that cheerleaders could be smart.

But Mayer is quick to point out that all through high school, her achievements were never characterized as ‘good for a girl.’ In fact, she is quite sure that being treated as a student, even a very smart student, rather than as the unusual girl who’s good at math and science, was critical in her success.

She went from Wausau to Stanford University, thinking that her future was in medicine. But after returning home for a break, she compared her chem and bio class work with her peers, and realized she wasn’t getting anything different than they were in various pre-med programs. She went back to Stanford looking for something unique, where she could excel and get an extraordinary education. She found herself drawn to Symbolic Systems — and ended up getting both her B.S. and M.S. in Computer Science from Stanford University, specializing in artificial intelligence.

If being a girl in CS at Stanford was hard, Mayer says she didn’t really remember. In fact, it wasn’t until she read the student newspaper one day, that it became clear that others DID notice her for more than her brains.

“There was this columnist at The Stanford Daily that I really liked. One day she wrote this column about campus icons, meaning people you recognize but you don’t know their name, like the crazy guy in the plaza who yells at you when you bike past him. So she had this list, and I was reading through her column and kind of chuckling to myself about these people, and then there was someone on the list that was ‘the blond woman in the upper-level division computer science classes.’ And I was like, ‘Who is that?’ And then I’m like, “Oh, it’s me!” so I guess I realized at that point that I was somewhat unusual.”

So, for Mayer — looking at the world without the filter of gender was an important part of her excelling on her own terms. She says it may be better not to ask the question: is this student a girl or a boy.

“Asking the question, I worry, sometimes can handicap progress,” she said. “I lived in a bubble. I was really good at chemistry and biology [growing up]. No one ever said, ‘Wow, you’re really good at this for a girl.”

“If I felt more self-conscious about being a woman it would have stifled me more.”

That said, Mayer is clearly proud of the fact that Google has more female engineers than many of the companies in the Valley. More than 20% at this point. But she’s clearly not hiring based on a quota or a goal. At Google, she just wants the very smartest people who are will to work very very hard.

Read original post at http://www.huffingtonpost.com/steve-rosenbaum/the-girl-in-computer-scie_b_1395408.html

New Girl Scout Research Affirms Girls’ Interest in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math February 14, 2012

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By Girl Scouts of the USA
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According to the Girl Scout Research Institute study Generation STEM: What Girls Say about Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math, though a majority of today’s girls have a clear interest in STEM, they don’t prioritize STEM fields when thinking about their future careers.

This latest offering from the Girl Scout Research Institute shows that 74 percent of teen girls are interested in STEM subjects and the general field of study. Further, a high 82 percent of girls see themselves as “smart enough to have a career in STEM.” And yet, few girls consider it their number-one career option: 81 percent of girls interested in STEM are interested in pursuing STEM careers, but only 13 percent say it’s their first choice. Additionally, girls express that they don’t know a lot about STEM careers and the opportunities afforded by these fields, with 60 percent of STEM-interested girls acknowledging that they know more about other careers than they do about STEM careers.

Girls are also aware that gender barriers persist in today’s society: 57 percent of those studied concur that if they were to pursue a STEM career, they would “have to work harder than a man to be taken seriously.”

As to what girls are drawn to with regard to these subjects, Generation STEM notes that the creative and hands-on aspects of STEM hold the most appeal. STEM-interested girls take an active, inquisitive approach to engaging in science, technology, engineering, and math: a high percentage like to solve problems (85%), build things and put things together (67%), do hands-on science projects (83%), and ask questions about how things work and find ways to answer these questions (80%). Girls enjoy the hands-on aspect of exploration and discovery and recognize the benefits of a challenge: 89 percent of all girls agree that “obstacles make me stronger.”

“While we know that the majority of girls prefer a hands-on approach in STEM fields, we also know that girls are motivated to make the world a better place and to help people,” says Kamla Modi, PhD, research and outreach analyst, Girl Scout Research Institute. “Girls may not understand how STEM careers help people, or how their STEM interests can further their goals of helping people. Girl Scouts of the USA is committed to engaging girls in STEM activities and encouraging them to pursue STEM interests both in and outside the classroom, [in part] through program partnerships.”

Girl Scouts’ relationship with AT&T constitutes one such partnership. Girl Scouts of the USA and AT&T have joined together to advance underserved high-school girls in science and engineering. As minority students and women are gravitating away from science and engineering toward other professions, and employment in STEM fields is increasing at a faster pace than in non-STEM fields, educational experts say the U.S. must increase proficiency and interest in these areas to compete in the global economy. Girl Scouts of the USA and AT&T are tackling this issue with a $1 million AT&T Aspire contribution, designed to spark STEM interest in underserved high-school girls across the country.

Addressing another critical Generation STEM finding—just 46 percent of girls know a woman in a STEM career—Girl Scouts of the USA and the New York Academy of Sciences have announced a partnership to design and implement a STEM mentoring program for Girl Scouts, modeled after the academy’s current afterschool STEM mentoring program. The new curriculum will be adapted and scaled to Girl Scouts’ network of more than 100 councils across the country. The goal is to identify and train young women scientists to serve as role models and mentors for girls, and to work in collaboration with Girl Scout volunteers to bring high-quality, hands-on, informal science education opportunities to middle-school Girl Scouts.

“America has a huge opportunity for economic growth with girls’ interest in science, technology, engineering, and math,” says Anna Maria Chavez, CEO, Girl Scouts of the USA. “When girls succeed, so does society. We all have a role to play in making girls feel supported and capable when it comes to involvement in STEM fields—and anything else they set their minds to and have traditionally been steered away from.”

About the Girl Scout Research InstituteThe Girl Scout Research Institute, formed in 2000, is a vital extension of Girl Scouts of the USA’s commitment to addressing the complex and ever-changing needs of girls. Comprised of a dedicated staff and advisors who are experts in child development, academia, government, business, and the not-for-profit sector, the institute conducts groundbreaking studies, releases critical facts and findings, and provides resources essential for the advancement of the well-being and safety of girls living in today’s world. The institute also informs public policy and advocacy for Girl Scouting with its research and outreach.

About Girl Scouts of the USAFounded in 1912, Girl Scouts of the USA is the preeminent leadership development organization for girls, with 3.2 million girl and adult members worldwide. Girl Scouts is the leading authority on girls’ healthy development, and builds girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. The organization serves girls from every corner of the United States and its territories. Girl Scouts of the USA also serves American girls and their classmates attending American or international schools overseas in 90 countries. For more information on how to join, volunteer or reconnect with, or donate to Girl Scouts, call 800-GSUSA-4-U or visit http://www.girlscouts.org.